Singapore considers electric harbour boats to cut carbon emissions

Singapore

Singapore is looking for proposals about the electrification of vessels called harbour craft since the business transitions towards a low-carbon near future, the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) said in a joint announcement earlier today.

The MPA is working together with the Singapore Maritime Institute (SMI) to seek advice from industry participants and institutes of higher learning or research institutes to create commercially ready entirely electric harbour craft.

They’re also looking for tips for beach charging infrastructure for electrical harbour craft and other electrical vessels working in Singapore’s port.

Proposals with a workable business model to be scaled upward will probably be favourably considered, MPA and SMI explained.

Harbour crafts are little vessels normally fuelled by petroleum which just function inside Singapore waters and are utilized to transport a few passengers, for towing other vessels or to transmit packed or dry cargoes.

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The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has a long-term objective to lower greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent from 2008 degrees by 2050. New IMO principles which came into effect this season simply restrict sulphur content in marine fuels.

“Green supply chain is the future of shipping and for Singapore to maintain its hub status, innovation must enable the transformation of the shipping industry through co-creation,” said Sanjay Kuttan, SMI’s executive manager.

The team at Platform Executive hope you have enjoyed this news article. Initial reporting via our official content partners at Thomson Reuters. Reporting by Jessica Jaganathan. Editing by Christian Schmollinger.

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