Twitter thinks hackers saw messages from 36 accounts

Platform News: Twitter and tweets

Twitter said that the hackers who breached its systems last week likely read the direct messages of 36 accounts, including one belonging to an elected official in the Netherlands.

KEY POINTS:

  • Twitter says the hackers who breached its systems last week probably read the direct messages of 36 accounts
  • The company however would not answer if the 36 accounts where messages might have been read included verified accounts

In tweets from its support account and an updated blog post, Twitter said it had no indication that the private messages of any other elected officials were obtained.

Twitter previously said the attackers tweeted from 45 “verified” accounts, including those belonging to such well-known names as CEO’s Elon Musk and Bill Gates and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Asked by journalists if the 36 accounts where messages might have been read included any verified accounts, Twitter said it would not answer.

In general, someone with the ability to tweet from an account would also be able to read previously sent or received messages that had not been deleted.

That would make it likely that some of the most famous people in the world had private messages read by hackers still at large. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating the case from its office in San Francisco, California.

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Twitter previously said that the attackers downloaded mass data from eight accounts, none of them the verified accounts with blue checks that include famous people, officials and some in the media.

The downloading tool does not provide access to Twitter messages, a spokeswoman said.

For accounts they won access to, the company said the hackers would have been able to see phone numbers and email addresses but not previous passwords.

The team at Platform Executive hope you have enjoyed the ‘Twitter thinks hackers saw messages from 36 accounts‘ article. Automatic translation from English to a growing list of languages via Google AI Cloud Translation. Initial reporting via our official content partners at Thomson Reuters. Reporting by Joseph Menn in San Francisco. Editing by Richard Pullin.

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