Twitter plans to relaunch its verification program next year

Twitter

Twitter has released plans for the new policy on how people are “verified” on the site, an area the company has long promised to revamp to handle confusion and criticisms over the blue check-mark badges it uses to authenticate the identity of prominent accounts.

The social networking company said in a blog post it plans to relaunch its verification program, such as a brand new public application procedure, in early 2021. It said a public comments period for the policy would start on Tuesday and run until December the 8th.

Twitter said it paused public admissions for verification in 2017 after hearing comments the program “felt arbitrary and confusing to many people.” It stated at the time that the check mark was being confused with “an endorsement or an indicator of importance.”

A year later, Twitter said it had been putting fixes into the verification program on the back burner to concentrate on issues such as election ethics, though it has continued to confirm several accounts, for example medical experts tweeting about COVID-19 this year.

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The company laid out more detailed criteria for its “core types” of noteworthy, lively accounts it will confirm, for example government officials, businesses, non-profits, information organizations, entertainers, sports teams, athletes and activists.

Twitter said it may also verify accounts that meet other standards such as being one of those top-followed accounts in the user’s country and having “off-Twitter notability,” which could be assessed via Google search tendencies, Wikipedia references or coverage in news outlets.

The company said it may cut on the blue badge out of accounts which seriously or repeatedly violate rules, such as its policies on hateful behaviour, civic ethics or glorification of violence. But it said those removals wouldn’t be automatic and could be assessed case by case.

Twitter also released proposed reasons for denying affirmation, as an instance, accounts that have been locked out for violating rules in the last six months or reports of individuals associated with hateful content or that have been found to have committed “gross human rights violations.”

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Twitter aims to present the last coverage on December the 17th. It also indicated plans for more ways for users to identify themselves using new account kinds and tags.

The team at Platform Executive hope you have enjoyed this news article. Initial reporting via our official content partners at Thomson Reuters. Reporting by Elizabeth Culliford in Birmingham, England. Editing by Matthew Lewis.

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