Singapore says blockchain payments project is now ready for commercial rollout

Singapore

Singapore has developed a blockchain-based payments network that could enable faster and cheaper international settlements, authorities have said, noting that the next step was a commercial rollout.

KEY POINTS:

  • The city state of Singapore have been developing a payments network called Project Ubin
  • The payments system is blockchain-based and could enable faster and cheaper cross-border settlements
  • Officials now say the the next step is commercial rollout

The final phase of the years-long ‘Project Ubin’ saw the Monetary Authority of Singapore team up with state investor Temasek and JP Morgan to develop the prototype multi-currency payments network.

“An international settlement network, modelled after this payments network prototype, could enable faster and cheaper transactions than conventional cross-border payments channels,” MAS and Temasek said in a joint statement.

They said that commercial applications of the prototype include cross-border payments in multiple currencies, foreign currency exchange, and settlement of foreign currency denominated securities as well as other use cases.

Blockchain, a digital ledger of transactions, leaped to prominence as the technology that underpins the first digital currency, bitcoin. It has since attracted global attention because it can be used to track, record and transfer assets across all industries.

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To spur further industry development, MAS and Temasek said it would make some of the technical specifications for the prototype network available to the public.

The team at Platform Executive hope you have enjoyed the ‘Singapore says blockchain payments project is now ready for commercial rollout‘ article. Automatic translation from English to a growing list of languages via Google AI Cloud Translation. Initial reporting via our official content partners at Thomson Reuters. Reporting by John Geddie. Editing by Shri Navaratnam.

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