Zoom says service restored after its US users were hit by partial outage

Platform News: Zoom communications logo

Video-conferencing company Zoom has said it had restored service to its US users after a partial outage left many unable to log in to work meetings or attend school classes remotely.

The California-based company has experienced a surge in usage during the coronavirus pandemic, as millions of people turn to it for work meetings, school, social events including weddings and to otherwise stay connected while isolating themselves. Many schools that turned to remote instruction have employed Zoom for courses.

Outage tracking site Downdetector.com showed nearly 17,000 incidents of people reporting problems with Zoom earlier in the day.

Users are now also able to sign up for paid accounts, upgrade, and manage their service on the Zoom website. “We are currently monitoring to ensure that these services are operational,” Zoom stated on its website.

The company didn’t provide details on the cause of outage.

Related Article:
US slaps French goods with a delayed 25% duties in digital tax row

Zoom’s stock has risen more than eight-fold because its initial public offering last year and four-fold so much in 2020, but it was down 2.9% after falling up to 5.4% earlier.

Zoom Video Communications competes with Cisco Systems’s Webex, Microsoft Corp’s Teams and Google Meet platform for paying clients, particularly enterprises, while offering a free version to customers.

Zoom had 300 million each day assembly participants in April, the latest figures disclosed.

Even as its use has jumped, Zoom has come under fire over privacy and safety issues, including incidents of “Zoom bombing” in which uninvited users disrupted meetings. It has since rolled out major updates, including end-to-end encryption for video calls.

Although a California company, Zoom has large R&D facilities based in China with hundreds of employees, according to a filing it made into the US government. This has led some political pundits to question the company on data, et alia.

Related Article:
Intel Capital invests in Chinese semi-conductor start-ups amid tech tensions

“As Zoom fatigue sets in and the pandemic eases, it’s even more important that the company demonstrates its systems are secure, if it’s to be seen as a long-term player in this competitive market,” Streeter added.

Users took to Twitter to whine about the outage.

“Zoom having a world wide outage for the first day of school, so 2020!” Twitter user Anthony Slaughter wrote.

The team at Platform Executive hope you have enjoyed this news article. Initial reporting via our content partners at Thomson Reuters. Reporting Munsif Vengattil and Subrat Patnaik in Bengaluru. Writing by Will Dunham. Editing by Sriraj Kalluvila and Richard Chang.

To stay on top of the latest developments across the platform economy and gain access to our problem-solving tools and content sets, you can become a member for just $7 per month.

Share This Post